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FIAT/IFTA Archive Session at IBC Saturday - 09 September

1 August 2006

How can we move broadcast archives into the digital world?

Chaired by Sue Malden

Increasingly, the answer is provided by facilities houses, rather than by broadcasters themselves. Facilities houses commonly deal with quick turnaround, individual, high value jobs for broadcasting, cinema and advertising. How do they cope with archives that can supply steady work potentially over years, but need a very low per-unit price? And how do they cope with cultural heritage material that is old, highly variable in condition and quality, and not (in some cases) of professional broadcast standards?

Rights: Traffic lights on the use and exploitation of television archives

Chaired by John Flewin

You may have the programme in the archive, but can you actually exploit it? You may have created or bought the content, but can you license the content to others?

IN DETAIL:

Broadcast Archives Fit for the Digital World (In association with FIAT/IFTA)
Chaired by: Sue Malden, FIAT/IFTA, UK

Participants:
Edwin van Huis, Beeld en Geluid, The Netherlands

Adrian Williams, BBC, UK

Simon Factor, Moving Media - Studios and Datacentre, Ireland

Jim Lindner, Media Matters LLC, USA

Michel Merton, Memnon Audio Archiving Services, Belgium

Daniel Teruggi, Institut National de l'Audiovisuel, France


How can we move broadcast archives into the digital world? Increasingly, the answer is provided by facilities houses, rather than by broadcasters themselves. Facilities houses commonly deal with quick turnaround, individual, high value jobs for broadcasting, cinema and advertising. How do they cope with archives that can supply steady work potentially over years, but need a very low per-unit price? And how do they cope with cultural heritage material that is old, highly variable in condition and quality, and not (in some cases) of professional broadcast standards? Yet facilities houses are coping, and starting to provide affordable services to archives -- including:-
· digitising film magnetic sound tracks with vinegar syndrome
· digitising shellac and vinyl audio recordings, as well as audiotape that can be over 50 years old
· digitising 2"", 1"" and U-Matic videotape, as well as miscellaneous lesser-known and domestic formats
· making 'access copies' or even high-resolution digitisation’s of film material (with colour-fade issues or just to make it more accessible in a TV production environment that is increasingly unwilling or unable to use film)
We will have a range of presentations by companies working in the archive preservation and digitisation field (and by companies making new equipment for preservation work) telling us:
· what they do and how they do it;
· The technology they have -- including adding new technology such as using the frequency-domain PAL decoders on analogue videotape playback and using new types of timebase correctors.
· new technology being developed -- HD film scanning at greater than real time and at videotape transfer prices; contact less pickup to avoid 'sticky-shed'; digital processing of optical sound tracks
· and finally, what they think of the archives as facility house customers and of preservation work as a business.

Rights: Traffic lights on the use and exploitation of television archives

Chaired by: John Flewin, Footage, UK

Participants:
Hubert Best, Bird and Bird, UK

You may have the programme in the archive, but can you actually exploit it? You may have created or bought the content, but can you license the content to others?

Case Study: If I license a historic clip of a 'personality' in a news situation for use in my programme, can I license that programme with the clip in it? If you arranged the right territory license with the clip owner, you can in the UK, Ireland and Australia. But in France and Germany you will have to seek permission from the personality.

Case Study: If I commissioned a new shot of the Eiffel Tower, can I license that shot for other uses? Yes, if it was shot in daylight, but not (without further permissions) if it was shot at night!

Case Study: If I make a programme for broadcast in my country, can I exploit it on-line? NO if you haven't negotiated a totally different set of clearances.

Welcome to the irrational and non-conformist world of licensing. One of the biggest barriers to earning secondary revenues from programming is not owner rights, but third party rights.

The business cases for programme and footage exploitation often ignore secondary rights issues. But they are crucial, and are often the stumbling block for success.

The session will try to be a plain man's guide to complex issues, and include examples of how some coped with it all -- and made money!